Kawai Kanjiro, master folkcraft ceramic artist

Kawai Kanjiro Museum

This fantastic museum was originally the longtime residence, workplace, and studio of the ceramic artist Kawai Kanjiro (1890-1966), who, together with Bernard Leach (a world famous British ceramics artist) and many others, helped to save the fast disappearing traditional folkcrafts of Japan in the 1920’s. The museum would be interesting to anyone who likes wood, ceramics, or old Japan. It was built in 1937 according to Kanjiro’s own design. He also created much of the furniture. The extensive house includes an old rising kiln (noborigama), his studio workshop, a garden area, and small collection of his works.

The museum would be interesting to anyone who likes wood, ceramics, or old Japan. It was built in 1937 according to Kanjiro’s own design. He also created much of the furniture. The extensive house includes an old rising kiln (noborigama), his studio workshop, a garden area, and small collection of his works. The interior of the house has been preserved the way he left it and offers a fascinating and detailed insight into Kanjiro’s life and work. In his words, “life is work, work is life” and this house proves this point perfectly. The interior of the house has been preserved the way he left it and offers a fascinating and detailed insight into Kanjiro’s life and work. In his words, “life is work, work is life” and this house proves this point perfectly.

Open daily 10:00-19:00. Located a tiny bit south-west of the intersection of Gojo and Higashioji.  Closed Mondays, except for national holidays when the museum is closed Tuesday). Admission: ¥700 for adults, ¥300 for children. Tel: 561-3585.

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Your Japan Private Tours

Ian Ropke has been active in the Japanese tourism industry for nearly 30 years. His book, A Historical Dictionary of Osaka and Kyoto is available on Amazon.com and Google Books.

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